Universitäre Psychiatrische Dienste (UPD)

Team

About Me

I am a neuropsychologist and developmental cognitive neuroscientist working as a post-doctoral research fellow at the University Hospital of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychotherapy. My research aims to achieve a deeper understanding of brain-cognition/behaviour interactions in typically and atypically developing children and adolescents. I am interested in early childhood adversity and biological or environmental precursors of developmental difficulties as well as mental health problems. Some of my recent research has centred on possible benefits of interventions to improve long-term neurodevelopment. I use a combination of measures, including neuropsychological, behavioural and clinical assessments as well as neuroimaging.

Jump to: 2019 | 2018

2019

Everts, Regula; Schöne, Corina G.; Mürner-Lavanchy, Ines; Steinlin, Maja (2019). Development of executive functions from childhood to adolescence in very preterm-born individuals - A longitudinal study. Early human development, 129, pp. 45-51. Elsevier 10.1016/j.earlhumdev.2018.12.012

Mürner-Lavanchy, Ines; Kidokoro, Hiroyuki; Thompson, Deanne K.; Doyle, Lex W.; Cheong, Jeanie L.Y.; Hunt, Rod W.; Inder, Terrie E.; Anderson, Peter J. (2019). Thirteen-Year Outcomes in Very Preterm Children Associated with Diffuse Excessive High Signal Intensity on Neonatal Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Journal of pediatrics, 206, 66-71.e1. Elsevier 10.1016/j.jpeds.2018.10.016

Pittet-Metrailler, M. P.; Mürner-Lavanchy, Ines; Adams, M.; Bickle-Graz, M.; Pfister, R. E.; Natalucci, G.; Grunt, Sebastian; Borradori Tolsa, C. (2019). Neurodevelopmental outcome at early school age in a Swiss national cohort of very preterm children. Swiss medical weekly, 149(w20084), w20084. EMH Schweizerischer Ärzteverlag 10.4414/smw.2019.20084

2018

Mürner-Lavanchy, Ines; Kelly, Claire E.; Reidy, Natalie; Doyle, Lex W.; Lee, Katherine J.; Inder, Terrie; Thompson, Deanne K.; Morgan, Angela T.; Anderson, Peter J. (2018). White matter microstructure is associated with language in children born very preterm. NeuroImage: Clinical, 20, pp. 808-822. Elsevier 10.1016/j.nicl.2018.09.020